Socioeconomic outcome area 13

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and households are safe

TARGET 13

By 2031, the rate of all forms of family violence and abuse against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children is reduced at least by 50 per cent, as progress towards zero

The data below are the most recent at the time of preparing the July 2021 report.
Please go to the Dashboard to access the current data.

Nationally in 2018-19, 8.4 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females aged 15 years and over experienced domestic physical or threatened physical harm (figure CtG13.1).

There are no new data since the baseline year of 2018-19.

Figure CtG13.1 displays the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females aged 15 years and over who have experienced domestic physical or threatened physical harm in the previous 12 months. The aim under Closing the Gap is to reduce the proportion by at least 50 per cent by 2030-31, as progress towards zero. With the 2018-19 baseline value of 8.4 per cent, this means a reduction to a target value of 4.2 percent by 2030-31.

Target data specifications

Target 13: All forms of family violence and abuse against women and children is reduced

Outcome:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and households are safe.

Target:

By 2031, the rate of all forms of family violence and abuse against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children is reduced at least by 50 per cent, as progress towards zero.

Indicator:

Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females aged 15 years and over who experienced domestic physical or threatened physical harm in the last 12 months.

Measure:

This measure is defined as:

Numerator — number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females aged 15 years and over who experienced physical harm and/or threatened face-to-face physical harm in the last 12 months where the perpetrator was a family member

Denominator — total number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females aged 15 years and over

and is presented as a percentage.

Target established:

National Agreement on Closing the Gap July 2020; revised April 2021

Latest dashboard update:

23 June 2021

Indicator type:

Target

Interpretation of change:

A low or decreasing proportion is desirable. A decrease from the baseline year is an improvement.

Data source(s):

Name: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (NATSIHS)

Frequency: Periodic

Documentation (links): https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/people/aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-peoples/national-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-health-survey/2018-19

Data provider:

Provider name: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Provider area: Centre for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics

Baseline year:

2018-19

Target year:

2030-31

Disaggregations:

State and territory and Australia.

Computation:

Numerator divided by Denominator multiplied by 100

Counting rules

Data are for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who were usual residents of private dwellings in Australia and were present at the survey interview.

Geographical variables are based on the location of the household.

‘Physical harm’ refers to any incident where a person was physically hurt or harmed by someone on purpose, including physical fights. Other forms of abuse (for example: sexual, emotional, psychological) are not included.

‘Threatened physical harm’ refers to threats of physical harm that occurred face-to-face.

‘Family/domestic violence (physical or threatened harm)’ includes perpetrators who are a current partner, previous partner, boyfriend, girlfriend, date, ex-boyfriend, ex-girlfriend, parent, child, sibling or other family member.

Excludes (numerator):

  • people who did not state if they were a victim of domestic physical or threatened physical harm.

Supporting calculations

  • Confidence intervals.

See the How to interpret data for further information: https://www.pc.gov.au/closing-the-gap-data/how-to/interpret-data.

Data quality considerations:

See NATSIHS methodology for further information: https://www.abs.gov.au/methodologies/national-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-health-survey-methodology

Data have been randomly adjusted using perturbation to avoid the release of confidential data. Discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals.

These data do not measure experience of violence for children.

Experiences of harm are likely to be under-reported. Due to the sensitive nature of the questions, responses were not compulsory, and a person may have chosen not to answer some or any of the questions.

The physical and threatened physical harm data collected in the 2018-19 NATSIHS are not comparable to other ABS data sources collecting similar data, including data from: the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey; the General Social Survey; the Personal Safety Survey; or, Recorded Crime – Victims.

Estimates that have a relative standard error between 25 per cent and 50 per cent should be used with caution. Estimates with a relative standard error of 50 per cent or more are considered too unreliable for general use.

Future reporting:

Additional disaggregations required for future reporting:

  • Remoteness areas and other small geographic areas (where available)
  • Disability status
  • Gender
  • Age
  • Indigenous status (comparable data on non-Indigenous people are currently not available).

Supporting indicators

Driver

  • Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women self-reporting physical violence experience
    By relationship to perpetrator
  • Rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child protection substantiations related to family violence
  • Rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children entering out-of-home care and receiving protection orders, where family violence is indicated
  • Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women reporting family violence is common in their communities
  • Rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community awareness of what constitutes family violence
    Physical and non-physical violence: sexual, emotional, psychological and economic abuse and violence
  • Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people identifying certain behaviours as forms of family violence
    Physical, sexual, emotional, psychological and financial control
  • Rate of community attitudinal support (acceptance) of violence against women and children
    Justifying, excusing, minimising, hiding or shifting blame for family violence
  • Rates of hospitalisation for family violence assaults for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children
    By relationship to perpetrator
  • Rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children homicide victim rates
    By victim-offender relationship

Contextual information

  • Rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children victims of family and domestic violence recorded by police
    Data available for NSW, SA & NT
  • Rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children victims of sexual assault, by victim-offender relationship
    Data available for NSW, QLD, SA & NT
  • Rates of hospitalisation for family violence assaults for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children
    By relationship to perpetrator
  • Rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children homicide victim rates
    By victim-offender relationship
  • Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women reporting to have sought help from support services
    Police, legal, counselling, housing, etc., by service type
  • Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women reporting barriers in seeking help from support services
    By barrier type
  • Rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women seeking assistance from Specialist Homelessness Services for reasons of family violence
    Admin data based; AIHW Specialist Homelessness Services database
  • Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons accompanied with children seeking assistance from Specialist Homelessness Services for reasons of family violence
    AIHW Specialist Homelessness Services database

The Productivity Commission acknowledges the Traditional Owners of Country throughout Australia and their continuing connection to land, waters and community. We pay our respects to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures, Country and Elders past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be aware that this website may contain images, voices or names of people who have passed away.