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Not everyone has a home that is safe and affordable

4 February 2022

During the COVID‑19 pandemic, we have become more familiar with our homes. They are essential to our lives: where we rest, care for our family, entertain friends and, increasingly, work.

But not everyone has a home that is safe and affordable. According to 2016 Census data, around 8000 people sleep rough, or live in improvised dwellings or tents. And another 108 000 have no permanent home. Many others face insecurity in the private rental market, struggling to afford the weekly rent.

The Productivity Commission has been asked to review how State, Territory and Australian Governments work together on housing and homelessness issues.

Many people who experience insecure or unaffordable housing will come into contact with government-funded programs. Governments fund various housing and homelessness services, including temporary accommodation and social housing. Other programs aim to make the private rental market more accessible, by providing information, support or financial assistance to tenants.

The Commission is keen to hear from people who have used these services, experienced homelessness, or faced barriers to renting or buying. We are also interested in hearing from organisations that work in the sector.

We have released an issues paper outlining some key questions and issues. We invite you to make a submission or brief comment before the closing date of 18 March 2022. For more information go to the Housing and Homelessness Agreement Review.