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Using Existing Results

Integrated Tariff Analysis System (ITAS)

Frequently Asked Questions - Using Existing Results

I want to create tables - how was table 4.4 created?

Table 4.4 uses data from WTOMCMB1.xls and WTOMCMB2.xls which are located in the \ITAS\MERGE directory. The average applied tariffs, Swiss8, Girard1a and Combined Swiss are in the rows which correspond to the variable name TU_APP which is the SAS summary variable name representing average applied rates. The Combined Swiss rates use Swiss8 for industrialised countries and the Swiss16 results for developing countries. The percentage changes were calculated from these data.

I want to set up a distribution graph - where are the data and how do I do it?

Distribution graphs such as those contained in figure 4.1 of the Staff Working Paper are generated using the histogram facility in Excel. The required data are contained in four files:

  • wtomcmax1.zip - initial and final (Girard formulas) bound and applied rates for each HS6 item (maximum across partners) for Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, China, EU, India, Indonesia and Japan;
  • wtomcmax2.zip - initial and final (Girard formulas) bound and applied rates for each HS6 item (maximum across partners) for Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Taiwan, Thailand and US;
  • wtomamax1.zip - initial and final (Chinese and Swiss formulas) bound and applied rates for each HS6 item (maximum across partners) for Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, China, EU, India, Indonesia and Japan; and
  • wtomamax2.zip - initial and final (Chinese and Swiss formulas) bound and applied rates for each HS6 item (maximum across partners) for Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Taiwan, Thailand and US.

I liked the line charts - where are the data and how do I create one?

Two types of line chart are useful for summarising tariff structures - one comparing bound and applied schedules and another comparing how a schedule of applied rates is expected to change when formulas are implemented (see figures 4.2 to 4.5 in the Staff Working Paper).

Data for these charts are contained in files wtomcmax1.zip and wtomcmax2.zip (Girard formulas) and wtomamax1.zip, wtomamax2.zip (Chinese and Swiss formulas).

An additional Excel file included with ITAS contains instructions for creating a line chart and two example charts, showing bound and applied rates for a country on one chart and initial and final applied rates for a country on another chart. Charts for other countries and/or formulas are created by replacing the data in the spreadsheet.

I need to summarise tariffs on chemical products - where do I find the data I need?

The import tariff module creates a set of sector-specific results. Average initial and final bound and applied rates for the chemical product sector of each importing country are contained in WTOMTT1.xls. Similar averages for high tariff items in the sector are contained in WTOMTT2.xls. (see Footnote i)

The market access module produces sectoral results relating to tariffs on Australia’s exports. (see Footnote ii) AUSXTT1.xls contains initial and final bound and applied tariffs averaged across trading partners and HS6 products in the chemical products sector.

How many commodities are there?

The 1996 HS6 classification currently adopted in ITAS identifies 5734 products, of which 4938 are industrial products.

Why aren't the formulas used at the individual line item level and what difference does aggregating to HS6 make?

Tariffs on bilateral imports are aggregated from line items to HS6 categories before formulas are used. Applying formulas at this level allows users to specify their own formulas, if required, and for ITAS to be made available to everyone, including non-authorised users in the sense of the WTO conditions of use. Applying formulas at the line item level would mean either hard-wiring particular formulas and making results aggregated to the HS6 level available, or restricting the availability of ITAS to users authorised to access WTO data.

Sensitivity analysis in appendix C shows that, for most countries and HS6 categories, there is little difference between initial and final tariffs estimated at the HS6 level or at the more disaggregated level.

Where do I get more information on WITS?

World Integrated Trade Solution (WITS) is a software system developed by the World Bank in close collaboration with UNCTAD. Although the software is free, use of the WITS-compatible databases may be subject to a fee or to access restrictions. Further information and registration details are available at http://wits.worldbank.org/witsweb.

Where do I get more information on MAcMap?

Market Access Map (MAcMap) is a database jointly produced by CEPII and the ITC. A range of information about the database and some selected simulation results are available on the MAcMap website, located at http://www.cepii.fr/anglaisgraph/bdd/macmap.htm.

Where do I get more information on PC-IDB?

Personal Computer Integrated Database (PC-IDB) is produced by the WTO. It is available on CD-ROM, but access is restricted to authorised WTO users. The database is periodically updated and distributed to WTO members. Further details are available by contacting the WTO.

Where do I get more information on GTAP?

The Global Trade Analysis Project model (GTAP) is a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy. The original model is documented in Hertel (1997). The latest version (version 6.2) was released in November 2003 and is available at http://www.GTAP.agecon.purdue.edu/.

The latest database used by GTAP (version 5) is documented in Dimaranan and McDougall (2002). The GTAP database is updated bi-annually, with the next release (version 6) due in 2004.

References

Dimaranan, B.V. and McDougall, R.A. 2002, Global Trade, Assistance, and Production: The GTAP 5 Data Base, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Purdue University.

Hertel, T.W. (ed) 1997, Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and Applications, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Footnotes

(i) High tariff items are those HS6 items with initial applied rates in excess of 15 per cent.
(ii) This module could be extended to cover exports from other countries, as outlined in Chapter 5.

 

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