Socioeconomic outcome area 2

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are born healthy and strong

TARGET 2

By 2031, increase the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies with a healthy birthweight to 91 per cent.

Nationally in 2019, 89.5 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies born were of a healthy birthweight (figure CtG2.1).

This is an increase from 88.8 per cent in 2017 (the baseline year).

Nationally, based on progress from the baseline, the target shows good improvement and is on track to be met. However, this assessment should be used with caution as it is based on a limited number of data points. Please see the How to interpret the data page for more information.

For states and territories, and nationally, based on progress from the baseline, there has been: Right arrow improvement   square no change   Left arrow worsening    not applicable as required data not available.

The assessment below reflects progress from the baseline (improvement, worsening or no change). For the national assessment, the target outcome shows good improvement and is on track to be met. The assessments below reflect progress from the baseline (improvement, worsening or no change). For the national assessment, the target outcome shows good improvement and is on track to be met.
NSW Vic Qld WA SA Tas ACT NT Aust
AssessmentNot applicable as required data not availableNot applicable as required data not availableNot applicable as required data not availableNot applicable as required data not availableNot applicable as required data not availableNot applicable as required data not availableNot applicable as required data not availableNot applicable as required data not availableGood improvement and target on track to be met

Right arrow improvement square no change Left arrow worsening not applicable as required data not available. tick good improvement and target on track to be met. circle improvement but target not on track to be met.

Note: These assessments of progress should be used with caution as they are based on a limited number of data points.

Disaggregations

Tables appear directly under figures:

Selections apply to all Disaggregation figures/tables below:

By sex of the baby

Nationally in 2019, 89.9 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander boys born and 89.2 per cent of girls born were of a healthy birthweight (figure CtG2.2).

By remoteness area

Nationally in 2019, the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies born of a healthy birthweight was highest in major cities and regional areas (ranging from 89.5 per cent in outer regional areas to 90.7 per cent in major cities), with the proportion lower in more remote areas (87.7 per cent in remote areas and 85.7 per cent in very remote areas) (figure CtG2.3).

By Index of Relative Socioeconomic Disadvantage (IRSD) quintile

Nationally in 2019, the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies born of a healthy birthweight was similar across all areas of relative socioeconomic disadvantage (between 90.1 and 91.5 per cent), except the most disadvantaged socioeconomic areas of Australia (88.4 per cent) (figure CtG2.4).

Target data specifications

Target 2: Increase the proportion of babies with a healthy birthweight

Outcome:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are born healthy and strong.

Target:

By 2031, increase the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies with a healthy birthweight to 91 per cent.

Indicator:

The proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies with a healthy birthweight.

Measure:

The measure is defined as:

Numerator — number of live born singleton Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies who weighed between 2500 and 4499 grams at birth

Denominator — total number of live born singleton Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies

and is presented as a percentage.

Target established:

National Agreement on Closing the Gap July 2020

Latest dashboard update:

31 March 2022

Indicator type:

Target

Interpretation of change:

A high or increasing proportion is desirable.

Data source(s):

Name: AIHW National Perinatal Data Collection (NPDC)

Frequency: Annual (2017 data revised (np for all jurisdictions – no change to national figure) in the March 2022 Dashboard update)

Documentation (links): https://www.aihw.gov.au/about-our-data/our-data-collections/national-perinatal-data-collection

Data provider:

Provider name: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Provider area: Perinatal

Baseline year:

2017

Latest reporting period

2019

Target year:

2031

Disaggregations:

State and territory and Australia, by birthweight range, by Indigenous status of the baby.

State and territory and Australia, by birthweight range, by Indigenous status of the baby, by sex of the baby.

State and territory and Australia, by birthweight range, by Indigenous status of the baby, by remoteness area.

State and territory and Australia, by birthweight range, by Indigenous status of the baby, by Index of Relative Socioeconomic Disadvantage (IRSD) quintile.

Computation:

Numerator divided by Denominator multiplied by 100

Counting rules

Data relate to live births. Births both less than 20 weeks gestation and less than 400 grams birthweight are not included in the NPCD.

Healthy birthweight is defined as babies who weighed between 2500 and 4499 grams at birth; low birthweight (400 grams to less than 2500 grams); high birthweight (4500 grams and over).

Data are by geographic area of usual residence of the mother.

Indigenous status is of the baby.

Excludes (both numerator and denominator):

  • births where the Indigenous status of the baby was not stated
  • births where the birthweight of the baby was not stated
  • multiple births
  • births of less than 20 weeks of gestation
  • Australian non-residents, residents of external territories and records where state/territory of residence was not stated.

Disaggregations:

Sex relates to biological primary sexual characteristics. Births classified as ‘indeterminate/not stated’ are excluded from the analysis by sex.

Remoteness area is classified according to the ABS 2016 Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS) using SA2 as the building block. Births to mothers whose usual residence is categorised as ‘migratory’ are excluded from the analysis by remoteness. Data exclude babies where the information on the usual residence of the mother was not sufficient to identify her geographic area and assign a remoteness area.

Socioeconomic status of the locality is classified according to the Socioeconomic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA): Index of Relative Socioeconomic Disadvantage (IRSD), 2016 using SA2 as the building block. Data are reported by IRSD quintile that are determined at the Australian level. Data excludes babies where the information on the usual residence of the mother was not sufficient to identify her geographic area and assign a socioeconomic status of the locality.

Supporting calculations

Variability bands (provided for proportions). See the How to interpret data page for further information.

Data quality considerations:

In the NPDC, Indigenous status is a measure of whether a person identifies as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin. All jurisdictions have a data item to record Indigenous status of the mother and Indigenous status of the baby on their perinatal form, although there are some differences among the jurisdictions.

Birthweight data on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies born to mothers residing in the ACT should be viewed with caution as they are based on small numbers of births.

Data for 2017 at the sub-national level have been omitted from this release as a geocoding issue was recently identified by the AIHW for the 2017 data. This issue impacts data reported for state/territory, SEIFA IRSD and remoteness area. These data are anticipated to be included in the next Dashboard update.

The AIHW does not provide data for proportions based on denominators of less than 100 for reliability reasons (mostly births with Indigenous status not stated). Proportions based on numerators of less than five are also not provided, with the exception of ‘not stated’ categories. However, relevant data are included in the calculation for Australian totals.

Future reporting:

Additional disaggregations required for future reporting:

  • Disability

Supporting indicators

Driver

  • Proportion of mothers who smoke during pregnancy by age groups
    Any time, or after 20 weeks
  • Proportion of mothers who consume alcohol during pregnancy by age groups
  • Proportion of pregnant mothers with a pre-existing health condition
    Gestational diabetes, obesity, hypertension, other
  • Use of antenatal care by pregnant women
    • proportion with five or more antenatal visits
    • proportion with at least one antenatal care visit in the first trimester
  • Proportion of pre-term births

Contextual information

  • Progress towards parity

Material for download

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