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Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture

Issues paper

This paper was released on 16 February 2016 to assist participants in preparing a submission to the public inquiry into Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture. It outlines a range of issues about which the Commission sought information.

Initial submissions were due by 31 March 2016.

Opportunity for further comment is now being sought on the draft report.

Download the issues paper

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Issues paper release

Productivity Commission to review all aspects of marine fishing

The Productivity Commission is asking people to share their views and knowledge of Australia's marine fishing and aquaculture sectors, both within state/territory and Commonwealth waters.

The Commission today released an issues paper to help individuals and organisations understand how to best contribute to the Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture Inquiry.

'The focus of our inquiry is on opportunities to improve fishing regulation without compromising policy objectives, including maximising the value to the Australian community from fisheries resources in a way that is consistent with the sustainability of those resources and the broader marine environment' said Commissioner Melinda Cilento.

The Commission will visit a number of areas where fishing is important to the local economy and community, but the best way to have your say is to provide a submission or comment through the Productivity Commission's inquiry web page.

This inquiry covers all fisheries users — recreational, customary and commercial - and welcomes comments from members of the general community with an interest in the marine environment.

'Marine fishing has undergone significant change. In a number of fishing areas, for example, the scale and profitability of commercial fishing has declined and recreational fishing activities and tourism now underpin economic activity. ' said Commissioner Melinda Cilento.

The inquiry is wide-ranging as our limited marine resource needs to be shared among different users and managed in a way that will ensure Australians can enjoy and get the most value from our marine resources now and into the future.

'The Australian marine fisheries sector is considered to be well managed by global standards, but this wasn't always the case, and there remains scope for improvement. We need to ensure the system deals effectively with changing technologies, environmental challenges like climate change, and is informed by high quality science and research,' said Commissioner Melinda Cilento.

The inquiry will identify opportunities to increase productivity and cut unnecessary and costly regulation including identifying where regulations are poorly coordinated between jurisdictions. Aquaculture and fish processing, wholesaling and retailing are within the scope of the review.

Background information

Leonora Nicol (Media, Publications and Web) 02 6240 3239 / 0417 665 443

Regional visits release

Productivity Commission wants to hear from regional areas on all aspects of marine fishing

As part of its inquiry into Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture, the Productivity Commission will be meeting interested parties in Cairns on Tuesday 8 March and Wednesday 9 March 2016.

'In the course of the inquiry we will be visiting a number of locations where fishing is important to the economy and community, whether it's commercial, recreational or customary fishing,' said Commissioner Melinda Cilento.

'We are meeting with recreational, commercial and environmental groups, as well as various authorities, to get their views on ways to improve and simplify fishing regulation without compromising fishery policy or environmental objectives,' Commissioner Melinda Cilento said.

'We obviously can't talk to everyone but I would really like to encourage anyone in Cairns who has an interest in marine fishing to provide a submission.

'You don't have to necessarily fish to make your views known, you may have an interest in how the marine environment is managed,' she said.

The Commission is seeking submissions as the primary form of input to the inquiry. However, stakeholders also have the option of just making a brief comment on the inquiry web page.

Questionnaires have also been set up on the Commission's website to hear from those with a specific interest in recreational or commercial fishing at www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/current/fisheries-aquaculture

The Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture inquiry is wide-ranging and covers all fisheries users - recreational, customary and commercial.

'This inquiry is important because our limited marine resource needs to be shared among different users and managed in a way that will ensure Australians can enjoy and get the most value from our marine resources now and into the future,' Commissioner Melinda Cilento said.

The Commission encourages people to visit their website and read the recently released issues paper developed to help individuals and organisations understand how to have input into the Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture Inquiry. The Issues Paper is available at www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/current/fisheries-aquaculture

The inquiry will identify opportunities to increase productivity and improve regulation, including identifying where regulations are poorly coordinated between jurisdictions. Aquaculture and fish processing, wholesaling and retailing are within the scope of the review.

Visits to regional areas include:

Tasmania 29 February - 1 March

Cairns, Townsville (Qld) 8-10 March

Port Lincoln, Adelaide (SA) 17-18 March

Background information

Pragya Giri (Administrative matters) 02 6240 3250 or fisheries.inquiry@pc.gov.au

Leonora Nicol (Media, Publications and Web) 02 6240 3239 / 0417 665 443