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Annual Report 1998-99

Annual Report Series

The Annual Report 1998-99 was released on 7 December 1999. The report draws together some key insights from the Commission's inquiry and research work during the past year which show how further reform can build on the substantial gains already achieved. The report forms part of the Commission's annual report series.

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  • Contents
  • Media release
  • Preliminaries

    Cover, Copyright, Acknowledgment, Contents, Abbreviations

  • Theme chapter

    1 Sustaining Australia's productivity performance (PDF - 33 Kb)

    An impressive productivity performance
    Competition policy
    Improving workplace productivity
    Industry assistance
    Addressing adjustment and social concerns

  • 2 Improving Australia's social infrastructure services

    Why performance matters
    Shortcomings have been recognised
    The contribution of performance measurement and benchmarking
    Incentives for better performance

  • 3 Commission activities

    Enhanced public consultation
    Feedback on the Commission's work
    Year in review
    Associated reporting

  • APPENDICES
  • A Corporate review
  • B Program performance
  • C Commissioned projects
  • D Supporting research and related activities
  • E Publications
  • F Financial statements
  • References
  • Index
  •  

The Government today released the Productivity Commission’s annual report for 1998-99. Commission Chairman, Gary Banks, said: “Australia is seeing the benefits of a decade or more of microeconomic reform. But in a highly competitive and rapidly changing world, the imperative for further reform remains if we are to secure higher living standards for all Australians.”

The report draws together some key insights from the Commission’s inquiry and research work during the past year which show how further reform can build on the substantial gains already achieved.

The Commission looks at recent developments in competition policy, work arrangements and industry assistance. It notes that competition policy has been an important driver of Australia’s improved economic performance. However, improved community understanding of the purpose and effects of reform would assist in completing the substantial reform task which lies ahead.

The Commission’s studies of container stevedoring, black coal mining, meat processing and large capital city building projects exemplify the importance of workplace arrangements to enterprise performance and productivity. Greater product market competition, together with revamped labour market regulation, have encouraged people to address restrictive arrangements in their workplaces. That said, there is scope to improve workplace productivity within the existing regulatory framework and to explore further regulatory flexibility.

The importance of social infrastructure to the wellbeing of Australians and the productivity of the economy as a whole is also highlighted in the annual report. The Commission argues that improving the efficiency and effectiveness of social infrastructure services — particularly education, training and healthcare — should be a priority for all Australian governments.

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